Advanced Certificate In Applied Plant Science


Course CodeVSC004
Fee CodeAC
Duration (approx)900 hours
QualificationAdvanced Certificate
  

Modules

Core ModulesThese modules provide foundation knowledge for the Advanced Certificate In Applied Plant Science.
 Biochemistry I (Plants) BSC102
 Botany I (Plant Physiology And Taxonomy) BSC104
 Trees For Rehabilitation BHT205
 Professional Practice For Consultants BBS301
 
Stream ModulesStudied after the core modules, stream modules cover more specific or niche subjects.
 Research Project I BGN102
 
Elective ModulesIn addition to the core modules, students study any 4 of the following 7 modules.
 Biochemistry II (Plant & Animal) BSC203
 Botany II (Plant Growth and Development) BSC204
 Microbiology BSC209
 Plant Breeding BHT236
 Biochemistry III (Plant Processes) BSC302
 Plant Ecology BSC305
 Tissue Culture BHT306
 

Note that each module in the Advanced Certificate In Applied Plant Science is a short course in its own right, and may be studied separately.


What is a Plant?

The majority of cultivated plants are flowering plants (or angiosperms). These plants have four main parts:

  1. Roots ‑the parts which generally grow below the soil
  2. Stems ‑the framework
  3. Leaves‑required for respiration, transpiration and photosynthesis
  4. Reproductive Parts ‑ flowers and fruits.

 

STEMS

The main stem and its branches are the framework that supports the leaves, flowers and fruits. The leaves, and also green stems, manufacture food via the process known as photosynthesis, which is transported to the flowers, fruits and roots. The vascular system within the stem consists of canals, or vessels, which transfer nutrients and water upwards and downwards through the plant (i.e.: This is equivalent to the blood system in animals).

Stems may be modified for a variety of reasons. Some modifications are:

  • tendrils ‑ instead of a defined branch, the stem is modified into a climbing tendril with leaves appearing periodically along the tendril
  • thorns ‑ thorns appear along the stem. It is in fact a modified stem. eg. Bougainvillea
  • prickle ‑ sharp appendage of the epidermis of the stem i.e. it is a trichome. It is not morphologically a stem, leaf, etc. eg. Rosa spp.
  • stolon or runners ‑ above ground eg. Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)
  • rhizome ‑ below ground eg. Canna spp.
  • stem tubers ‑ large fleshy storage regions eg: potato
  • corm ‑ function as a food storage to carry the plant over till next season eg: gladioli
  • cladodes and phylloclades ‑ a cladode is a branch of a single internode which is flattened to simulate a leaf. A phylloclade is an entire shoot similarly flattened.

 

LEAVES

The primary function of leaves is photosynthesise, which is a process in which light energy is caught from the sun and stored via a chemical reaction in the form of carbohydrates such as sugars. Leaves are also the principle plant part involved in the process known as transpiration whereby water evaporating, mainly through the leaf pores (or stomata), sometimes through the leaf cuticle (or surface) as well, passes out of the leaf into a drier external environment. This evaporating water helps regulate the temperature of the plant. This process may also operate in the reverse direction whereby water vapour from a humid external environment will pass into the drier leaf. The process of water evaporating from the leaves is very important in that it creates a water gradient or potential between the upper and lower parts of the plant. As the water evaporates from the plant cells in the leaves then more water is drawn from neighbouring cells to replace the lost water. Water is then drawn into those neighbouring cells from their neighbours and from conducting vessels in the stems. This process continues, eventually drawing water into the roots from the ground until the water gradient has been sufficiently reduced. As the water moves throughout the plant it carries nutrients, hormones, enzymes etc. In effect this passage of water through the plant has a similar effect to a water pump, in this case causing water to be drawn from the ground, through the plant and eventually out into the atmosphere.

A leaf consists basically of a petiole (stalk of the leaf) and a lamina (blade of the leaf). The leaf may be simple or compound (compound leaves consist of a number of smaller leaflets).

There are many leaf modifications that may occur including :

  • stipules ‑ at the base of the petiole appearing like winged leaves eg: peas
  • leaf sheath ‑ leaf base surrounded by a sheath which encases the stem. eg. grasses and sedges.
  • ochrea ‑ a membranous sheath arising from the leaf base and surrounding the axillary bud and stem for a short distance above the node. eg. Polygonaceae family.
  • bulbs ‑ storage tissue eg: daffodil, onion
  • ligule ‑ a small membranous or ciliate appendage at the top of the leaf sheath in most grasses.
  • tendrils ‑ the leaf is modified into a tendril. Identifiable due to the bud at the base of the tendril with frequently large stipules. eg. peas.
  • leaf spines ‑ small spines either on the margins or the whole leaf. Have buds at the union with the stem which indicates a modified leaf. eg thistle and Opuntia spp.
  • phyllode ‑ characteristic of Acacias where the lamina is very small and the petiole is enlarged.
  • pulvinus ‑ swelling at the base of the leaf and leaflets, provides the ability to allow movement by turgidity eg: Mimosa pudica
  • auricle ‑ small ear like appendage on grasses
  • cataphylls ‑ reduced leaves at base of plant eg. bud and rhizome scales.
  • hypsophylls ‑ reduced leaves on apex of plant eg. bracts, floral leaves.

 

ROOTS

Soil provides the plant with the following things:

  1. Nutrients
  2. Water
  3. Air
  4. Support
Roots absorb nutrients, water and gasses transmitting these "chemicals" to feed other parts of the plant. Roots hold the plant in position and stop it from falling over or blowing away.
 
Level of Study This course is designed as post secondary level studies (after secondary school).  The course is similar in length to diplomas offered by many other colleges. The studies are both theoretical and practical. The learning style is "experiential", and the concept of problem based learning (originally developed for medical degrees) is used in order to help student's develop a higher capacity to solve real world problems. After Your Study An understanding of plant science underpins many important industries, including horticulture, forestry, farming and environmental management. Plants provide fibre, food, fuel, building materials, pharmaceuticals and many other things we need for our modern lifestyle. People who have a heightened knowledge of plant science, have an enhanced value for working in any of these industries. Over recent decades, there has been a decline in the range of courses and number of students studying botany; perhaps because the importance of this area of study has not been as obvious to the politicians and bureaucrats who fund education. As such, demand for plant science experts is likely to only increase as "older" experts retire, and fewer younger experts are available to replace them. After your course, you need to start building your experience working with plants. Some may find opportunities such as working in a plant nursery or laboratory.and others may start their own business.  If you have it in mind to be a botanist or plant ecologist, you may need to continue studying; but don't make the mistake of assuming that a university degree alone is any guarantee of such a career. Statistics show that many university graduates today, do not work in the disciplines they studied. This is often because despite their education; they don't have the experience and other life skills that are needed for the job. If you want a successful career in plant sciences; you are better to take a holistic approach to developing your career.. It is often better to studying a shorter qualification (such as this) while building experience, developing industry contacts, problem solving and communication skills etc. This can get you started on a career path, and you can then learn more and raise your level of expertise as you move along through your career.


Level of Study

This course is designed as post-secondary level studies (after secondary school). 
The course is similar in length to diplomas offered by many other colleges.
The studies are both theoretical and practical. The learning style is "experiential", and the concept of problem based learning (originally developed for medical degrees) is used in order to help student's develop a higher capacity to solve real world problems.


After Your Study

An understanding of plant science underpins many important industries, including horticulture, forestry, farming and environmental management. Plants provide fibre, food, fuel, building materials, pharmaceuticals and many other things we need for our modern lifestyle. People who have a heightened knowledge of plant science, have an enhanced value for working in any of these industries.


Over recent decades, there has been a decline in the range of courses and number of students studying botany; perhaps because the importance of this area of study has not been as obvious to the politicians and bureaucrats who fund education. As such, demand for plant science experts is likely to only increase as "older" experts retire, and fewer younger experts are available to replace them.


After your course, you need to start building your experience working with plants. Some may find opportunities such as working in a plant nursery or laboratory and others may start their own business. 
If you have it in mind to be a botanist or plant ecologist, you may need to continue studying; but don't make the mistake of assuming that a university degree alone is any guarantee of such a career. Statistics show that many university graduates today do not work in the disciplines they studied. This is often because despite their education; they don't have the experience and other life skills that are needed for the job.
If you want a successful career in plant sciences; you are better to take a holistic approach to developing your career.

It is often better to studying a shorter qualification (such as this) while building experience, developing industry contacts, problem solving and communication skills etc. This can get you started on a career path, and you can then learn more and raise your level of expertise as you move along through your career. 

CHOOSING A COURSE: MAKE THE BEST CHOICE

 
Let us help with our Free Career and Course Counselling Service.
 
 
 
Contact one of our science academics.
Learn from our experience
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

or Enrol
-go to top of the page for enrolment (right column)


Save Save
Save
Save
Save
Save
Save

Credentials

This course is accredited by the International Accreditation and Recognition Council.
This course is accredited by the International Accreditation and Recognition Council.

ACS is an Organisational Member of the British Institute for Learning and Development
ACS is an Organisational Member of the British Institute for Learning and Development

Member of Study Gold Coast, Education Network
Member of Study Gold Coast, Education Network

ACS Global Partner - Affiliated with colleges in seven countries around the world.
ACS Global Partner - Affiliated with colleges in seven countries around the world.



Need assistance?



Start Now!