AQUACULTURE

- Start a fish farm!

- Work in the aquaculture industry!

- Or just become self-sufficient, growing fish at home!

Where Do You Start?

Talk to us about what's involved in fresh water aquaculture!

We can advise on good books, or if you really want to get serious, consider enrolling in our online Aquaculture Course!

 

FISH FOODS AND FEEDING

 

Feeding fish is expensive and needs regular attention and labor. Feed conversion rates fluctuate rapidly unless carefully controlled.

Feeding is best done at set times during the day so that the fish become conditioned to congregating at a particular feeding point at the same time each day.

Hand feeding with pelletized feed should be done early morning, mid morning, mid afternoon and late afternoon for best results. Handfuls are broadcasted onto the water surface until feeding activity starts to slow down (usually between 2 to 5 minutes).

Demand feeders are sometimes used which work by the fish knocking a gyrating rod which releases a few pellets at a time. Unfortunately, some fish are known to eat virtually all day and into the early night (especially trout). Farmers who use demand feeders find a great increase in the food used (and therefore cost) without any great improvement in production.

Auto‑feeders operate on a timing switch and released pre‑determined amount of feed to a pond at a pre‑determined time.

PELLETED FEED

Floating pellets have the advantage over sinking pellets by reducing feed wastage. Non‑floating pellets sink quickly to the floor of the dam and are frequently covered with mud and not eaten. Fine meal and very small pellets are necessary for young fish. Usually about three grades of pellets can be used during the life of fish.

LIVE FEED

Live food organisms can be used where they are available in sufficient quantities to be an economical harvestable and usable food resource. In some cases live feed can be produced on the farm with little expense but requires effort and attention if it is to be done successfully. Unused live feed can be dried for a later date. Live feeds reach maximum production under warm and sunny conditions, therefore the summer production must ensure sufficient feed for the cold winter months also.


 

Distance Education Course in Fresh Water Aquaculture from ACS Distance Education

AQUACULTURE (BAG211)

Nominal duration : 100 hours

COURSE AIMS

To develop your abilities to independently analyse and make decisions about the development and management of freshwater aquaculture enterprises.

Aquaculture is the farming of water creatures for human consumption. This subject is concerned with the culture and care of fresh water aquatic animals. There are ten lessons in this course, each requiring approximately about 10 hours work.

- Explain different aquaculture production systems.

- Explain the cultural requirements of different types of fish suitable for aquaculture.

- Explain cultural practices for freshwater crayfish.

- Explain different factors affecting the vigour of animals in an aquaculture farm.

- Explain methods, including feeding and harvesting, used to manage freshwater animal populations.

- Develop informed management decisions for an aquaculture enterprise.

COURSE STRUCTURE

There are ten lessons as follows:

1. AQUACULTURE INTRODUCTION

2. PRODUCTION SYSTEMS ‑ EP AND IP

3. WHAT SPECIES TO FARM

4. TROUT

5. BARRAMUNDI

6. BASS

7. FRESHWATER CRAYFISH

8. SETTING UP A FISH FARM

9. FISH FOODS AND FEEDING

10. HARVESTING

WHAT YOU WILL DO IN THIS COURSE

Here are just some examples of what you will do:

- List the components of an aquaculture production system.

- Compare extensive production systems with intensive production systems.

- Assess the production systems used in three different aquaculture enterprises.

- Describe a successful aquaculture production system.

- List freshwater fish suitable for aquaculture.

- List saltwater fish suitable for aquaculture.

- Describe the requirements for different commonly grown freshwater fish.

- Describe the requirements of one type of salt water fish which has commercial potential for farming at a latitude the same as your locality.

- Distinguish, by labelling unlabelled diagrams, between visual characteristics of different freshwater crayfish

- Describe the cultural practices for different freshwater crayfish

- Compare the advantages and disadvantages of aquaculture with those of two other types of agricultural enterprises.

 

 

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