Weed Control

Course CodeBHT209
Fee CodeS2
Duration (approx)100 hours
  

Increase productivity
and reduce environmental impact by correct management of weeds.

Who is this course for?
This course provides valuable learning for land managers, farmers, gardeners, orchardists, market gardeners, landscapers, spray contractors, nurserymen or anyone else concerned with the control of weeds.
 
How Weeds are Controlled
There are many different ways of controlling weeds, and literally thousands of different weed species which might need controlling. It is always important to use the appropriate treatment for the weed(s) in question. Young weeds are far easier to control than older ones. Some chemicals, for instance will effectively kill certain weeds when they are in the early stages of growth, but will not control other types of weeds. You may need to be able to distinguish between types of weeds to determine whether the chemical will or won't work.

Lesson Structure

There are 7 lessons in this course:

  1. Weed Identification
    • review of the system of plant identification
    • general characteristics of the weeds
  2. Weed Control Methods
    • practical research on management of weeds
    • understanding terminology and the use of mulches
  3. Chemical Weed Control
    • review of commercial and domestic herbicides
    • determining what differentiates them, their availability and use.
  4. Weed Control In Specific Situations
    • understanding weed control strategies for particular situations
    • accessing first hand information about weed control from industry leaders
    • determining a weed control program for five different sites.
  5. Safe Chemical Application
    • reviewing what types of chemicals and application methods are used in the industry
    • the required safety procedures for the handling and administrating chemical herbicides.
  6. Non-Chemical Weed Control
    • determining any detrimental effects chemical herbicides have on the environment
    • reviewing non-chemical applications and their effectiveness.
  7. Developing A Major Weed Control Program
    • devise a weed management plan for a designated area.

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Distinguish between different types of weeds, and identify common weed species, growing in your locality.
  • Explain the characteristics of different weed control methods.
  • Explain the use of chemical herbicides to control weeds.
  • Specify appropriate weed control methods, for different types of situations.
  • Determine appropriate techniques for the safe application of chemical herbicide in a specific situation.
  • Explain different non-chemical weed control methods.
  • Devise appropriate methods for control of weeds, for specific problems, in both the horticultural and agricultural industries
  • Determine a detailed weed control program for a significant weed problem.

What You Will Do

  • Observe and consider over 100 different varieties of weeds and prepare plant review sheets for different weed plants.
  • Make up a list of information resources.
  • Plant, grow and observe different varieties of weeds.
  • Make drawings of young seedlings of at least fifteen different weeds.
  • Speak/interview people who have to deal with weed control in their daily life.
  • Visit a nursery, garden shop or hardware store that sells herbicides to the public.
  • Visit at least one supplier of herbicides for industrial and agricultural use.
  • Contact larger chemical companies for leaflets on different herbicides.
  • Investigate at least two workplaces where weed control programs are regularly carried out.
  • Visit and inspect different sites where weeds are a problem.
  • Photograph different places that have been treated with weedicides.
  • Contact your local Department of Agriculture or Lands Department for researching purposes.
  • Visit several farmers who raise different types of livestock.
  • Develop a 12 month guideline for an integrated weed control program for a particular site.

What are Weeds?

"A weed is any plant that is growing where you don't want it". 
  • A weed will compete with your desired plants for light, space, water and nutrients.
  • It might taint the milk from your animals, or be toxic to animals making them sick.
A plant could also be a weed because of a particular characteristic; it could be poisonous to stock or humans, if it acts as a host plant to pests and diseases (of both other plants and/or animals), if it has damaging roots, or if it causes allergies.

Any plant has the potential to be a weed.

 

Farmers who do not control weeds, will have a less productive farm!
 
 
There are many different ways of controlling weeds, and literally thousands of different weed species which might need controlling. It is always important to use the appropriate treatment for the weed(s) in question. Young weeds are far easier to control than older ones. Some chemicals, for instance will effectively kill certain weeds when they are in the early stages of growth, but will not control other types of weeds. You may need to be able to distinguish between types of weeds to determine whether the chemical will or won't work.

 

STEPS IN CONTROLLING WEEDS

  1. Know what weed or weeds you are dealing with.
  2. Know how those varieties grow, and what conditions they do and don't tolerate.
  3. Then create conditions which they don't like.
  4. You then need to consider whether you want to kill or just control the weeds.
When you know these things you can consider which method is best for your situation."
 
 
Weeds on Farms
Some types of weeds may never be a serious practical threat to the productivity of a farm. They may look untidy; but farm animals might eat them, or pasture grasses may compete with them; stopping them from ever getting out of control. Some weeds however can become a very serious problem on a farm.
 
Toxic Weeds
Poisonous plants are considered to be weeds (i.e. unwanted plants) by many people, though others may in fact prize those plants for their beauty. Some poisonous plants cause mild irritation such as skin rashes, but others can cause serious illness, or even death. These can affect both farm animals and people on the farm. Common poisonous plants include: Arum Lily, Datura or Brugmansia (Angel’s Trumpet), Dieffenbachia, Digitalis (Foxglove), Nerium (Oleander), and Rhus.

Noxious Weeds
These are weeds which have become such a serious problem that they have been declared "noxious" by government authorities. Once a weed is declared noxious, it becomes illegal to grow that plant either intentionally or unintentionally. Property owners may be forced to eradicate the weed or have government authorities enter their property and eradicate it. Fines may be incurred for growing the plant. Weeds may be declared noxious in one part of a country and not another, or may be considered noxious throughout an entire country.

Environmental Weeds
Many garden plants escape into bush or farmland areas, where they can compete or even completely take over from other vegetation. Foreign plants will flourish without the pests and diseases that kept them in check in their original country, if suitable pollinators and seed dispersing animals are present - all at the expense of the native plants. Garden creepers or ramblers can encroach upon pastures, diminishing edible grasses. Plants may spread by being dumped (common along railway lines) or by seed, often carried by birds. Another problem is that garden plants can sometimes cross-pollinate with farm species or the local native (indigenous) plants. This interbreeding results in hybrids which interfere with the natural evolution of the indigenous plants, and can destabilize the ecosystem on a farm.

 
Use our free career and course counselling service.

 
 
 
 


Credentials

ACS Global Partner - Affiliated with colleges in seven countries around the world.
ACS Global Partner - Affiliated with colleges in seven countries around the world.

ACS is recognised by the IARC
ACS is recognised by the IARC



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  Rosemary Davies

Leading horticultural expert in Australia. Rosemary trained in Horticultural Applied Science at Melbourne University. Initially she worked with Agriculture Victoria as an extension officer, taught horticulture students, worked on radio with ABC radio (clocking up over 24 years as a presenter of garden talkback programs, initially the only woman presenter on gardening in Victoria) and she simultaneously developed a career as a writer. She then studied Education and Training, teaching TAFE apprentices and developing curriculum for TAFE, before taking up an offer as a full time columnist with the Herald and Weekly Times and its magazine department after a number of years as columnist with the Age. She has worked for a number of companies in writing and publications, PR community education and management and has led several tours to Europe. In 1999 Rosemary was BPW Bendigo Business Woman of the Year and is one of the founders and the Patron, of the Friends of the Bendigo Botanic gardens. She has completed her 6th book this year and is working on concepts for several others. Rosemary has a B Ed, BSc Hort, Dip Advertising & Marketing
  John Mason

Parks Manager, Nurseryman, Landscape Designer, Garden Writer and Consultant. Over 40 years experience; working in Victoria, Queensland and the UK. He is one of the most widely published garden writers in the world; author of more than 70 books and editor for 4 different gardening magazines. John has been recognised by his peers being made a fellow of the Institute of Horticulture in the UK, as well as by the Australian Institute of Horticulture.
  Robert James

B.App. Sc. (Horticulture), Dip.Ag., M.Sc., Grad Dip.Mgt. Over 50 years experience that includes, Nursery Manager Brisbane City Councoil, Grounds Manager (University of Qld), Lecturer Qld Agricultural College, Propagator/Nurseryman at Aspley Nursery, Horticulturist, Horticultural Scientist, and Horticultural Consultant
  Maggi Brown

Maggi is regarded as an expert in organic growing throughout the UK, having worked for two decades as Education Officer at the world renowned Henry Doubleday Research Association. She has been active in education, environmental management and horticulture across the UK for more than three decades. Some of Maggi's qualifications include RHS Cert. Hort. Cert. Ed. Member RHS Life Member Garden Organic (HDRA) .
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