Introduction To Photography

Course CodeBPH100
Fee CodeS1
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment
  

Photography Distance Education Course -

  • Learn the basics and lay a foundation for serious photography
  • Lots of Personal Guidance from Professional Photographers
  • Self paced 100 hour course -options to upgrade to a certificate or diploma
  • Explore business and career options; or pursue a serious hobby

 

ACS graduate comment: "I found it to be an excellent course in basic Film Photography. The section on exposure was very clear. I appreciate the diagrams and clear concise directions in developing and enlarging film. The staff were very kind and my tutor was very encouraging and always gave clear feedback. I was very happy with the flexibility of the course. I moved to a different country and was able to continue with the course." Emma Day, USA Introduction to Photography course.

Another comment from one of our Introduction to Photography students:

"Glad I signed up"    G. Gadja

A crucial fact underlies all photography -though many different technologies can produce images, the quality of those images is eventually judged by our own eyes.

Through this course reference is made back to the individual's perception of light through their eyes, and the similarities and differences between the eye and the camera.

Learn about:

  • aperture
  • shutter speed
  • depth of field
  • camera angles etc.

 


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Lesson Structure

There are 8 lessons in this course:

  1. Origins of Photography:
    • To discuss the principles those underpins photography and examine the evolution into digital technologies.
  2. Film
    • To explain how photographic images are able to be captured on film or digitally. This lesson will also explain how photographic images are able to be captured by digital cameras.
  3. Photo Equipment: Cameras
    • To provide you with a firm understanding of how you can work at improving your capabilities with respect to taking photographs
  4. Photo Equipment
    • To determine appropriate application for a range of common items of photographic equipment and develop an understanding of how digital images can be transferred effectively from a digital camera
  5. Processing/Developing Images
    • Developing Different Film Types, Processing Solutions, Fixer, Developer, Stop Bath, Fixing, Washing, Wetting Agents, Drying, etc.
  6. Enlarging and Photo Manipulation
    • Describe the process by which photographic film may be enlarged. Also explains techniques that can be used to process digital photographs within a computer to achieve improved or changed images.
  7. Lighting
    • To work more effectively with light when taking photographs.
  8. Fault Finding
    • Common Problems, and how to deal with them.

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Discuss the principles those underpins photography and examine the evolution into digital technologies.
  • Explain how photographic images are able to be captured on film. This lesson will also explain how photographic images are able to be captured by digital cameras.
  • Provide you with a firm understanding of how you can work at improving your capabilities with respect to taking photographs. It provides a framework, upon which you will base your work in future lessons.
  • Determine appropriate application for a range of common items of photographic equipment
    • and develop an understanding of how digital images can be transferred effectively from a digital camera
  • Explain how photographic film is developed.
  • Describe the process by which photographic film may be enlarged. Also explain techniques that can be used to process digital photographs within a computer to achieve improved or changed images.
  • Work more effectively with light when taking photographs.
  • To identify and avoid common faults in photographs.

What You Will Do

  • You're given instructions throughout this subject guide to do various things ... you may be asked to contact an organisation, you may be given something to read, or some information to research. Various tasks will be given to you to develop your knowledge and abilities in photography care. Along with these tasks, you will also be given questions to answer at the end of each lesson, which you submit as an assignment to your tutor.

 

Tips for CAMERA STABILITY

On shutter speeds under 1/125 second, chances of the picture being blurred are high (because of either camera movement or movement of the subject).

 

EXAMPLE:

 

If the correct exposure combination on an overcast day for 100 ISO film is F16 and a 30th second, you will risk camera shake.

(NB: When shutter speed or F stop is altered, this doubles or halves the exposure. Both variables thus alter the amount of light entering the camera in the same proportion; but in different ways).

Instead of F16 at a 30th you could choose one of the following:

 

  •  F11 at a 60th (You determine this by doubling the light via the aperture and halving the shutter speed...the result is the same).
  •  F8 at a 125th of a second
  •  F5.6 at a 250th of a second.

 

By operating at F8 or F5.6 we can reduce the chance of camera movement.

 

If you want to freeze movement in a picture (eg: If you are photographing a moving person or animal), the lowest speed you should use is a 125th second.

If there is rapid movement or movement closer to the camera, then the photograph needs to be taken at a higher speed.

To stop a car speeding past at 75 kph for example, you would need a 1000th second whereas if the same car was moving towards or away from the camera a minimum speed of 1/125th would be acceptable.

 

Everyone's ability to hold a camera still varies, as does every situation where you photograph moving objects, so despite recommendations, it is only experience which will teach you what minimum speeds you can use in different situations.

 

What happens when the meter tells you to set F stop at 2.8 and film speed at a 15th second; and F2.8 is our maximum working aperture. We have no choice but to follow the meter's direction. If we had expected to shoot in dim light, we could have used a faster film (ie. with a higher ISO).

The other option is to hold the camera still and not photograph anything with much movement.

 

Camera movement can be reduced the following ways:

Tripod and cable release.
Your finger pushing the shutter button can move a camera on a tripod. By using a cable attachment, you can release the shutter by pressing a plunger in the cable, greatly reducing any chance of camera movement.

Sit the camera on a solid object.
Sitting the camera on top of a wall, fence, table or some other solid object, and composing your picture from that point.

Using a timer mechanism to release the shutter.
If the camera is sitting on a solid object or a tripod, you can set a ten second delay so the shutter releases without you pushing it and risking movement.

Lean your body against a wall,  fence or some other solid object when taking the photograph.
This reduces body movement.

Stand with your legs apart
This gives greater stability than with legs close together.

Breathe out slowly and evenly as you press the button
This gives less movement than if you hold your breath.
 

 

WHAT NEXT?
 
 
ENROL (go to top) or
 
Use our FREE Counselling Service to Connect with a Tutor
 
 

 


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Credentials

ACS is an Organisational Member of the British Institute for Learning and Development
ACS is an Organisational Member of the British Institute for Learning and Development

Member of Study Gold Coast, Education Network
Member of Study Gold Coast, Education Network

ACS Global Partner - Affiliated with colleges in seven countries around the world.
ACS Global Partner - Affiliated with colleges in seven countries around the world.

ACS is recognised by the International Accreditation and Recognition Council
ACS is recognised by the International Accreditation and Recognition Council



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  John Edwards

Professional photographer. Experienced in Environmental and Water Services management. Has traveled extensively for photography projects. John has a BA (Hons) Photography, BSc (Hons) Env.Mgt, PGCE
  Rachel Syers

Rachel has worked as a newspaper journalist for the past 15 years in a range of roles from sub-editor and social columnist to news reporter, covering rounds such as education, health, council, music, television, court, police, Aboriginal and Islander affairs, and agriculture. Her current role is Fashion Editor, features writer and features sub-editor with The Gold Coast Bulletin. She has co-authored a successful biography "Roma: From Prison to Paradise" about former prisoner-of-war turned yoga guru, Roma Blair, as well as freelanced as a writer, reviewer and researcher for Australian music and celebrity magazines such as WHO Weekly, Rave, Australasian Post and New Idea. Rachel has a B.Journalism.
  Christine Todd

University lecturer, businesswoman, photographer, consultant and sustainability expert; with over 40 years industry experience B.A., M.Plan.Prac., M.A.(Social). An expert in planning, with years of practical experience in permaculture.
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